Mama Diaries

Monday, September 26, 2016

Mr. CFO

My twelve-year-old son had a class field trip to a place called Biz Town. At Biz Town, the kids are given grown-up jobs. They spend seven hours that day working their grown-up jobs. My boy's job was as CFO (chief financial officer) of Delta Airlines. I don't know how the boy got selected for that one, but he was the man.


He had one of the largest offices in the place, and a steady stream of "employees" consulting him about budgeting and payment issues. The boy was kept busy the entire day. While he enjoyed one of the highest salaries, he was not thrilled with the small amount of free time he had. "Everyone else got to check things out, while I had to sit behind the desk and deal with piles of papers!"


"So, how did you do?" I asked.


"We didn't go bankrupt," he said.


"That's good," I said.


"But we only ended up with $200 for operating costs for the next day."


Hmmm. Well, at least it's nice to know that Delta Airlines has lived to fly another day.


Before I go, I want to let you know I'm giving away free downloads of my book, Ten Zany Birds, on Smashwords. If you'd like to get one, follow the link and use coupon code WJ95M. Offer expires October 26, 2016.


44 comments:

  1. Delta Airlines only wishes it had an operating budget like that! Tell the boy, welcome to the real world.

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    1. He should enjoy being a kid as long as he can!

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  2. Sounds like great experience for the students. Just wondering what job Bubba wished he'd been given.

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  3. I think more schools should do this exercise with their students. They'll see its not all that easy. Yay to not going bankrupt ♡ xox

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  4. He's probably doing better than some real life finance officers!

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  5. Avoiding bankruptcy is good. Always working is a wake up call indeed.

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  6. Sounds like he learned something that day.

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  7. What a wonderful experience for your son and what an achievement.

    Yvonne.

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  8. He's certainly had first hand experience of the corporate world. That is wonderful. Maybe he'll be a farmer instead now that he knows what that's like. Thanks for the lovely giveaway.

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    1. Farmer Bubba. He'd probably enjoy operating a tractor.

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  9. Bubba the executive. Think of all these experiences he's already had. Go Bubba!

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  10. He could have ended the day in the red. Congratulations, Bubba!

    Love,
    Janie

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  11. Way to go, Bubba! I love that idea of kids working real jobs for a day. I think most have a poor vision of what adults actually do at work all week!

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    1. This gave them a good idea of what goes on.

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  12. Hi Sherry,

    Returned to say I took your offer! Thanks for Ten Zany Birds.

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  13. Oh my. Whew! That's definitely a way to bring reality home to these young kids, eh?

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  14. I haven't heard of things like this, I would have loved to do something like that when I was at school. Wow that's such a life lesson!

    Raindrops of Sapphire

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  15. Now that is an interesting experience. I'm trying to imagine what they did to simulate the job.

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    1. They gave him a big office. That much I know.

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  16. Funny:) Closest I had to that was a day of astronaut camp, but at least mission control didn't crash and burn;)

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  17. Phew! Good thing Bubba kept the airline going. 👍

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  18. Uh oh, he's gonna have to sell a ton of $6 bags of peanuts to recoup those operating costs!

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  19. Well, they didn't go bankrupt, so that's always a good news, isn't it?

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  20. What an amazing field trip. Wish I'd got to be a CFO at twelve.

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    Replies
    1. If he had the real income of a CFO, that would have been even better.

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  21. Must have been a fun day and time for him!

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